Finding Non-Toxic Sustainable Bike Gear

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Living a sustainable lifestyle is important to me and I do my best to purchase eco-friendly products. I rarely shop for new things but when it becomes necessary, I make sure to question if the product is ethically and sustainably sourced. That’s why I find it important to learn about different types of ecolabel certifications and harmful ingredients I should be avoiding. Having this knowledge helps me choose greener options that are more friendly to my body and to this Earth.

Many people look to bicycles when it comes to choosing eco-friendly transportation. I love using my bike for commute, running errands and strolling through a woodsy trail. It’s the best way to sneak in some exercise and travel short-distance without contributing to carbon emission.

*This post may contain affiliate link. I only recommend products I believe will add value to you.

When it came to finding non-toxic bike gears, I was shocked to find out how limited I was in my options. My goal was to find chemical-free alternatives and to avoid products made in China because of possible lead contamination. But in reality, I couldn’t find budget-friendly green choices sold in the USA. I first approached my search with the motivation to find the perfect sustainable product. In the end, I had to make some exceptions because of limited availability. I did want to avoid making compromises but it was necessary for me to be more flexible and open with my options. I decided to focus on being mindful through the process and do what I can at the moment instead of aiming for perfection. 

I intend to use everything I bought for a long time so I can avoid making unnecessary purchases in the future.

Biodegradable Bike Helmet

Wearing a non-toxic helmet was my top priority because I wanted to avoid toxins from petroleum-based material. I decided to buy a plant-based bio-foam helmet made of biodegradable corn. I initially wanted to buy a plastic-free helmet made of cork lining and wooden shell but it was custom made and out of my budget. I did find a foldable recycled paper helmet from EcoHelmet. The one I purchased is from Giro and it is deconstructable which makes all components ready for either recycling or composting after use.

Recycled Pannier

I went with an Axiom’s Seymour pannier made of reclaimed fishing nets from the ocean. The company does not specify how much percentage is recycled material. I also found Green Guru Gear pannier made from upcycled billboards and banners. I chose the Seymour pannier because it was compatible with my bike rack and it was more budget friendly.

Petroleum-free Bike Lube (Not Vegan)

Most conventional bike lubes are carcinogenic and contain flammable vapors. I decided to go chemical-free by choosing petroleum-free lanolin oil. This was a tough choice because lanolin is derived from sheep raised for wool which makes it non-vegan and unsustainable. I use coconut oil on other parts of the bike but I avoid using it on the chain because plant-based oil can corrode metal. I am still on the search for a vegan option.

Rechargeable Bike Light

Rechargeable bike light allows me to avoid single-use battery. A rechargeable battery is also a zero-waste option but I decided to charge mine with solar power.

Used Bike Gear

Buying used bicycle and bike gear is also an option because even sustainable products consume energy and valuable resources during manufacturing. The only downside is not knowing what it’s made of unless the previous owner provides the original packaging. You will not be able to tell if it contains chemicals that are toxic to your body. If that is not your priority, go for it!

Bike Locks

The locks I found which were made from major bike gear brands were labeled with Proposition 65 by the state of California. Which means that it contains chemicals known to cause cancer, birth defects or other reproductive harm. I have not found a durable bike lock that does not contain heavy metal toxins.

Happy biking!

Thank you for listening

Living a sustainable lifestyle is important to me and I do my best to purchase eco-friendly products. I rarely shop for new things but when it becomes necessary, I make sure to question if the product is ethically and sustainably sourced. That’s why I find it important to learn about different types of ecolabel certifications and harmful ingredients I should be avoiding. Having this knowledge helps me choose greener options that are more friendly to my body and to this Earth.

Many people look to bicycles when it comes to choosing eco-friendly transportation. I love using my bike for commute, running errands and strolling through a woodsy trail. It’s the best way to sneak in some exercise and travel short-distance without contributing to carbon emission.

*This post may contain affiliate link. I only recommend products I believe will add value to you.

When it came to finding non-toxic bike gears, I was shocked to find out how limited I was in my options. My goal was to find chemical-free alternatives and to avoid products made in China because of possible lead contamination. But in reality, I couldn’t find budget-friendly green choices sold in the USA. I first approached my search with the motivation to find the perfect sustainable product. In the end, I had to make some exceptions because of limited availability. I did want to avoid making compromises but it was necessary for me to be more flexible and open with my options. I decided to focus on being mindful through the process and do what I can at the moment instead of aiming for perfection. 

I intend to use everything I bought for a long time so I can avoid making unnecessary purchases in the future.

Biodegradable Bike Helmet

Wearing a non-toxic helmet was my top priority because I wanted to avoid toxins from petroleum-based material. I decided to buy a plant-based bio-foam helmet made of biodegradable corn. I initially wanted to buy a plastic-free helmet made of cork lining and wooden shell but it was custom made and out of my budget. I did find a foldable recycled paper helmet from EcoHelmet. The one I purchased is from Giro and it is deconstructable which makes all components ready for either recycling or composting after use.

Recycled Pannier

I went with an Axiom’s Seymour pannier made of reclaimed fishing nets from the ocean. The company does not specify how much percentage is recycled material. I also found Green Guru Gear pannier made from upcycled billboards and banners. I chose the Seymour pannier because it was compatible with my bike rack and it was more budget friendly.

Petroleum-free Bike Lube (Not Vegan)

Most conventional bike lubes are carcinogenic and contain flammable vapors. I decided to go chemical-free by choosing petroleum-free lanolin oil. This was a tough choice because lanolin is derived from sheep raised for wool which makes it non-vegan and unsustainable. I use coconut oil on other parts of the bike but I avoid using it on the chain because plant-based oil can corrode metal. I am still on the search for a vegan option.

Rechargeable Bike Light

Rechargeable bike light allows me to avoid single-use battery. A rechargeable battery is also a zero-waste option but I decided to charge mine with solar power.

Used Bike Gear

Buying used bicycle and bike gear is also an option because even sustainable products consume energy and valuable resources during manufacturing. The only downside is not knowing what it’s made of unless the previous owner provides the original packaging. You will not be able to tell if it contains chemicals that are toxic to your body. If that is not your priority, go for it!

Bike Locks

The locks I found which were made from major bike gear brands were labeled with Proposition 65 by the state of California. Which means that it contains chemicals known to cause cancer, birth defects or other reproductive harm. I have not found a durable bike lock that does not contain heavy metal toxins.

Happy biking!

Thank you for listening
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